Monthly Archives

February 2020

ODAC General Sesson Dermatology Conference

SANOVAWORKS IS BRIDGING THE GAP FOR GENERATIONAL LEARNING

By | A Note from Shelley, Uncategorized

NEW YORK (Feb. 27, 2020) – A Note from Shelley Tanner, SanovaWorks CEO/President

Ask a Boomer, a Gen Xer, and a Millenial about their favorite icon. Considering the word “icon” means different things to different people, the answers will likely vary. An icon is a person of great stature, a Boomer might reply.  A Millennial may point to an app on a smartphone. GenX may request clarification. Communicating with audiences that include multiple generations requires a multidimensional approach. For the first time in history 4 – 5 generations are working together in the workforce.  This presents challenges for human resources, communication directors, and learning and development teams. How do we effectively bridge the gap between generations for generational learning? At SanovaWorks we consider the differences in communication and learning styles among our multigenerational clients. We make sure we hit all the marks when presenting the educational materials through our print, online and in person conferences. Why? Because results matter.

What is a generation?

Wikipedia defines a generation as:

“All of the people born and living at about the same time, regarded collectively.” It can also be described as, “the average period, generally considered to be about thirty years, during which children are born and grow up, become adults, and begin to have children of their own”. 

For the first time in history 4 – 5 generations are in the workforce a the same time. Those generations are: 

  • Traditionalists—born 1925 to 1945
  • Baby Boomers—born 1946 to 1964
  • Generation X—born 1965 to 1980
  • Millennials—born 1981 to 2000
  • Generation Z—born 2001 to 2020

According to a 2015 Pew Research Center survey “just 26% of internet users ages 65 and over say they feel very confident when using computers, smartphones or other electronic devices to do the things they need to do online”.

Teeniors is an inspiration

The startup Teeniors founded by Trish Lopez, pairs teens and young adults with older adults to help them learn technology through one-on-one coaching. This brilliant idea was born out of a personal need when Trish realized her mother needed help.

In this NPR article that first aired on Morning Edition Trish explains, “The intergenerational learning experience is really remarkable and that’s why I always say the main service we provide is not tech support. It is human connection.” 

Millennials are currently the largest group in the workforce. However, considering that in the field of healthcare, practitioners don’t tend to retire early–or at all. Many doctors and nurses continue to work into their golden years. This presents a unique challenge when communicating, educating, and marketing to these individuals. 

Bridging the gap between generations is necessary to effectively get your message out, and educate in the preferred mode or learning and communication style. Doctors aged 75 and 35 consume information in different ways. Print is more appropriate for one age group while email is the preference for the other. One generation uses pen and paper while another uses apps like Evernote

Print vs. Digital, the Great Debate

This article, that first appeared in Education Week in 2014, highlights research that shows greater comprehension when reading is performed via print rather than in digital format. 

“We have to move into the 21st century, but we should do so with great care to build a ‘bi-literate’ brain that has the circuitry for ‘deep reading’ skills, and at the same time is adept with technology,” said Maryanne Wolf, the director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University in Medford, Mass.

And this article from the Washington post proclaims, Textbook makers, bookstore owners and college student surveys all say millennials still strongly prefer print for pleasure and learning, a bias that surprises reading experts given the same group’s proclivity to consume most other content digitally.”

What is Generational Learning?

The various generations have always had their own language, slang and pop culture. But since the technology age has been fully ushered in, generational learning differences are of major consideration when presenting content, data, and learning objectives. Communication channels are also of significant interest across the generations. While one generation prefers emails, another prefers phone calls, and yet another would rather get a text message.

There are key distinctions on how generations in the workforce today learn most comfortably. Baby Boomers were taught in a linear fashion. Gen Xers were taught in pods or modules. Millennials were taught in a more constructivist environment. Examining these differences and finding similarities and opportunities for connecting the generations in the classroom or online is a key component to success.

The subject matters.

Linda Warren explains “Having considered educational trends and computer skills, it’s important to note that the nature of a subject has a lot to do with the way it is taught. For example, some topics have to be taught in a linear manner. Some have definite right and wrong answers while others allow multiple correct options. The subject matter has a lot to do with the way training is structured, regardless of the target audience”

How SanovaWorks Bridges the Generational Gap

At SanovaWorks we offer diverse material and tailor each communication and learning experience so that we reach our unique and niche audiences that span across the generations. We effectively bridge generational gaps using a mix of  print, digital content, email, websites, study tools, podcasts and of course of sold out live conferences.

We cater to individuals who learn by:

  • classroom lecture
  • listening
  • reading
  • taking tests
  • in class participation
  • reflection and feedback
  • highly personalized training
  • on-demand information
  • self-directed that enable them to learn on their own schedule

REFERENCES:

Barriers to Adoption and Attitudes Towards Technology

pewresearch.org

Youth Teaching Tech To Seniors Fosters Generational Connections, NPR

Are Learning Differences Between Generations a Myth

Why digital natives prefer reading in print. Yes, you read that right.

Friedman Dermatologist ODAC disaster preparedness

ODAC AND JDD HELP IDENTIFY NEED FOR DISASTER TRAINING AMONG DERMATOLOGISTS

By | ODAC, Press

A new study from the George Washington University found that many dermatologists are unprepared to respond to biological disasters and that the specialty would benefit from formal preparedness training.

WASHINGTON (Jan. 30, 2020) — The dermatology community is inadequately prepared for a biological disaster and would benefit from a formal preparedness training program, according to a study from the George Washington University (GW). The article is published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.

Natural and man-made disasters can cause a range of dermatologic conditions due to environmental exposures, such as secondary infections following a flood, irritation from blistering agents used in chemical warfare, and acute and chronic effects of cutaneous radiation syndrome. A 2003 survey revealed that 88% of dermatologists felt unprepared to respond to a biological attack — this new survey shows that the need for training still exists.

“Recognizing and diagnosing the conditions that can arise following a disaster requires diagnostic acumen, knowledge on reporting, and short- and long-term management strategies,” said Adam Friedman, MD, interim chair of the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and senior author on the study.

This current survey from an interdisciplinary team of dermatology and emergency medicine researchers, led by Emily Murphy, a research fellow in the GW Department of Dermatology, examines whether the field of dermatology has advanced in its bioterrorism preparedness.

The survey, disseminated via the ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical conference listserv, found that only 28.9% of respondents received training in disaster preparedness and response. The respondents to the survey frequently commented that they felt dermatologists should be prepared for bioterrorism-related cutaneous diseases, such as anthrax or smallpox-related diseases, as well as infections resulting from natural disasters.

Similar to the 2003 survey, the authors found that few dermatologists received adequate bioterrorism preparedness training. Even among those who had reported training, many indicated they felt ill prepared to manage patients affected by disasters, especially biological attacks and nuclear or radiological events.

“While few respondents to the survey were trained in disaster preparedness, it is encouraging that 75% reported that it should be included in dermatology training,” Friedman said. “It is a necessary tool to advance the field.”

James Phillips, MD, section chief of disaster and operational medicine in the GW Department of Emergency Medicine, director of the GW Disaster Medicine Fellowship, and co-author on the study, agreed: “My fellows and I found great value in partnering with our dermatology colleagues for this project. It is my firm belief that, while disaster medicine and emergency management primarily fall within the scope of emergency medicine and trauma surgery, education, and training for other specialties is of great value and is virtually unexplored. In an increasingly complex disaster environment, we welcome such research collaborations with other GW specialists.”

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The article, titled “A Survey of Dermatologists’ Preparedness for Natural and Man-made Disasters,” is published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and can be found at jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961620P0016X/1.